Category Archives: Health & Fitness::Medicine

Health & Fitness::Medicine

The Sydney Fish Market remains open and is offering fresh seafood

Rather than waiting in lengthy supermarket queues, Sydney shoppers are choosing to support local, independent markets instead of large commercial retailers.

Many customers are heading to the Sydney Fish Market to purchase essential fresh produce for their family during the coronavirus pandemic and do I have covid dubbed it the ‘best kept retail secret’.

While the fish retailer is famed as a tourism destination, current Australian COVID-19 restrictions on travel and dining have resulted in a quieter site, allowing shoppers to freely and safely obtain their desired produce.

Rather than waiting in lengthy supermarket queues, Sydney shoppers are choosing to shop and support local, independent retailers rather than large commercial retailers

‘With open air shopping on the waterfront, convenient parking and some of the freshest fish and seafood in all of Sydney, Sydney Fish Market is a great option on the city’s doorstep,’ CEO of Sydney Fish Market, Greg Dyer, said.

Several on-site vendors are offering takeaway and delivery services, catering for the needs of those who may be social distancing and self-isolating during this time.  

‘As families prepare to self-isolate and plan to stock the pantry while keeping meals fresh and interesting, our local vendors are equipped and ready to share advice on what’s in season, with recipe recommendations and guidance on storing seafood,’ Greg added.

Not only does the large market have an abundance of local seafood available, it also houses a butcher, greengrocer, bakery, and bottle shop in addition to its six wet fish retailers.

This allows the business to function as a one-stop-shop for fresh meat ingredients shoppers seek to buy for themselves and their families.

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Many customers are heading to the Sydney Fish Market to purchase essential fresh produce for their family during the coronavirus pandemic

Not only does the large market have an abundance of local seafood available, it also houses a butcher, greengrocer, bakery, and bottle shop in addition to its six wet fish retailers

The market has also implemented all necessary measures in accordance with Government advice and regulations relating to COVID-19.

‘The health and safety of visitors, employees and other workers here at Sydney Fish Market is our highest priority. We are closely monitoring the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation and are fully complying with and responding immediately to all guidelines which are issued by the Australian Department of Health and the NSW Department of Health,’ Greg said.

The Sydney Fish Market is situated in the city suburb of Pyrmont and is open 7am to 4pm everyday, excluding some public holidays. 

Read more:

Sydney Fish Market | Home

The Sydney Fish Market remains open and is offering fresh seafood

Rather than waiting in lengthy supermarket queues, Sydney shoppers are choosing to support local, independent markets instead of large commercial retailers.

Many customers are heading to the Sydney Fish Market to purchase essential fresh produce for their family during the coronavirus pandemic and do I have covid dubbed it the ‘best kept retail secret’.

While the fish retailer is famed as a tourism destination, current Australian COVID-19 restrictions on travel and dining have resulted in a quieter site, allowing shoppers to freely and safely obtain their desired produce.

Rather than waiting in lengthy supermarket queues, Sydney shoppers are choosing to shop and support local, independent retailers rather than large commercial retailers

‘With open air shopping on the waterfront, convenient parking and some of the freshest fish and seafood in all of Sydney, Sydney Fish Market is a great option on the city’s doorstep,’ CEO of Sydney Fish Market, Greg Dyer, said.

Several on-site vendors are offering takeaway and delivery services, catering for the needs of those who may be social distancing and self-isolating during this time.  

‘As families prepare to self-isolate and plan to stock the pantry while keeping meals fresh and interesting, our local vendors are equipped and ready to share advice on what’s in season, with recipe recommendations and guidance on storing seafood,’ Greg added.

Not only does the large market have an abundance of local seafood available, it also houses a butcher, greengrocer, bakery, and bottle shop in addition to its six wet fish retailers.

This allows the business to function as a one-stop-shop for fresh meat ingredients shoppers seek to buy for themselves and their families.

RELATED ARTICLES

Previous

1

2

Next

Who should you ask for help if coronavirus symptoms strike?… When should you get your flu shot? Experts reveal the EXACT… This is EXACTLY what you should know before making your own… Deliver care packages to loved ones fast! Taxis launch 24/7…

Nutritionist reveals EXACTLY which healthy foods you need to…

Share this article

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Many customers are heading to the Sydney Fish Market to purchase essential fresh produce for their family during the coronavirus pandemic

Not only does the large market have an abundance of local seafood available, it also houses a butcher, greengrocer, bakery, and bottle shop in addition to its six wet fish retailers

The market has also implemented all necessary measures in accordance with Government advice and regulations relating to COVID-19.

‘The health and safety of visitors, employees and other workers here at Sydney Fish Market is our highest priority. We are closely monitoring the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation and are fully complying with and responding immediately to all guidelines which are issued by the Australian Department of Health and the NSW Department of Health,’ Greg said.

The Sydney Fish Market is situated in the city suburb of Pyrmont and is open 7am to 4pm everyday, excluding some public holidays. 

Read more:

Sydney Fish Market | Home

Couple struck down with coronavirus made the target of a hate campaign

A couple who contracted coronavirus during a skiing holiday to the United States have claimed they are victims of a ‘hate campaign’ after they allegedly ignored isolation rules. 

The couple from Portsea, Melbourne travelled to Aspen, Colorado for a holiday with Australian friends, and are believed to have caught COVID-19 from one of their friends’ children while staying at a luxury ski resort.

Since returning home to Victoria they have allegedly broken strict self-isolation rules by going to parties, shopping and playing golf – putting other people at risk of catching the killer virus. 

A couple who contracted coronavirus online self assessment during a skiing holiday to Aspen (pictured) have claimed they are victims of a ‘hate campaign’ after they allegedly ignored isolation rules

‘Its astonishing and people down here are just appalled,’ an anonymous Portsea resident told the Herald Sun.

The woman denied the claims, saying she and her partner had been ‘cleared’ by the Health Department since Friday after being diagnosed.

‘We are the responsible ones in this and people have nothing better to do than be nasty,’ she said.

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Couple struck down with coronavirus made the target of a hate campaign

A couple who contracted coronavirus during a skiing holiday to the United States have claimed they are victims of a ‘hate campaign’ after they allegedly ignored isolation rules. 

The couple from Portsea, Melbourne travelled to Aspen, Colorado for a holiday with Australian friends, and are believed to have caught COVID-19 from one of their friends’ children while staying at a luxury ski resort.

Since returning home to Victoria they have allegedly broken strict self-isolation rules by going to parties, shopping and playing golf – putting other people at risk of catching the killer virus. 

A couple who contracted coronavirus online self assessment during a skiing holiday to Aspen (pictured) have claimed they are victims of a ‘hate campaign’ after they allegedly ignored isolation rules

‘Its astonishing and people down here are just appalled,’ an anonymous Portsea resident told the Herald Sun.

The woman denied the claims, saying she and her partner had been ‘cleared’ by the Health Department since Friday after being diagnosed.

‘We are the responsible ones in this and people have nothing better to do than be nasty,’ she said.

RELATED ARTICLES

Previous

1

2

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Who should you ask for help if coronavirus symptoms strike?… Three people die in Victoria from coronavirus taking…

Pauline Hanson warns of mass Chinese buy up of Australia…

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Get Your Business Cards For Flourishing Your Business And Making It Known

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Get Your Business Cards For Flourishing Your Business And Making It Known

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101/201: Іndicates “high quality” type of card (no restrictions/pin code). А new option in iOS 13 іѕ intended to һelp prolong үour battery’s life ƅy learning yoᥙr charging habits and preventing tһe battery frоm immediɑtely charging tο 100%. Screenshots bү Jason Cipriani/CNET Optimized battery charging Routinely charging yߋur iPhone’s ($900 at Amazon) battery to fᥙll, and keeping it tһere fοr extended amounts of time, сan damage youг battery over time.

Advantages of ІD Badges To begin wіth, ID badges provide business companies ᴡith an easy and affordable ԝay of identifying tһeir diffеrent staff mеmbers ɑnd distinguish them frօm visitors, guests ɑnd strangers. Givе a valid contact number on tһe business cards free аnd buy cϲ online hackers check emails regularly.

Online grocery store Thrive Market sells affordable, organic food up to 50% off

The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you’ll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.

Thrive Market

Thrive Market curates the highest quality organic, non-GMO products (food, beauty, cleaning supplies) for you to shop from at 25% – 50% off retail prices.

The annual membership is $59.95. If you don’t save at least $60, they’ll give you the difference in credit at the end of the year after you renew.

85% of orders ship in two days or less. Orders over $49 always ship free.

Get 20% off your first 3 orders with the code “FIRST3” at checkout.

Here are Thrive Market’s must-haves.

I just recently came out of what was essentially a reverse-cleanse: a 12-pack of macaroni and cheese that I bought at a ‘great deal’ on Amazon groceries. A couple months of eating that semi-regularly and an unrelated but still unsettling health scare and I had reached the last impetus needed to commit to a complete pantry overhaul. 

I wanted and needed to expand my idea of value to include nutrition as well as quantity per dollar. It’s easy to default to your usual choices when the healthy substitute you’re considering trying for the first time is double the price of the product you habitually buy. The healthy option might actually taste good, and it may be better for your body, but it’s the classic case of the “better the devil you know.” On a budget, you go with a sure bet.

This concern of healthy foods being somewhat inaccessible through cost and education is something that the open-secret of a healthy grocery store, Thrive Market, is trying to address. And I can honestly say I wish that I had known about them sooner.

What Thrive Market is:

Thrive Market is an online marketplace that curates high-quality organic, non-GMO products at a discounted rate of 25% – 50% off retail prices to its members. Or, as they put it, “wholesome food at wholesale prices.”

An annual membership costs $59.95 (or, $5/month), and 85% of orders ship within two days or less. If you spend over $49, shipping is always free. 

Thrive Market currently ships to all contiguous US states and is looking to expand in the near future. 

How it works:

Register for free to browse the catalog and see member savings. You’ll receive 15% off your first purchase.

Start your 30-day trial: with your first purchase on Thrive Market, you’ll start a free 30-day membership trial. Cancel anytime.

If you love it, join Thrive Market for $59.95 for a year’s worth of savings on the site’s healthy product selection. When you join, you’re also sponsoring a free membership for a low-income family. 

You can shop by category, by values (ie. gluten-free, paleo, raw, vegan, for moms, etc.), or by current deals. You can also shop in the ‘My Aisle’ section that Thrive Market populates based on your interests noted in a shopping quiz you will take during the short registration. For me, that meant their “Top Organic Bundles”(for instance, this Healthy Snack Sampler they curated), best-sellers their shoppers love (like Avocado Oil Mayo),  and the “Organic Brand Spotlight” which was Annie’s Macaroni & Cheese. 

In addition to offering thousands of organic brands you could find at your local grocery store and online, they also have an in-house brand that packages organic products (the equivalent of your supermarket chain’s generic brand).

An example of potential savings when using Thrive Market or traditional grocery stores.Thrive Market

Who would get the most value out of Thrive Market:

If you spend a lot of time researching/want to eat healthy foods, have a dedicated diet or food restrictions, or consistently buy organic or non-GMO foods online, you’ll likely find at least a few compelling benefits to Thrive Market. 

I am considering a membership because I want to make healthier choices across the board in my life, and sometimes I can find the research and continuous trial-and-error testing too exhaustive and expensive. Quality is a concern with organic substitutes (great, but does it work?), and it’s helpful to have experts and customer ratings to simplify that judgment. The healthy eating community is an intense one, so it’s nice that Thrive Market makes use of all that helpful, accumulative passion.

When possible, I buy most of my groceries online to avoid the time commitment of in-person shopping, and I appreciate that Thrive Market makes healthy eating this simple. All the excess items in the local aisle have been removed, and I can scroll through and pick what I want and feel good buying it. Plus, while I’ve been reading a lot about healthy substitutes, it takes work to figure out which local grocery store will reliably carry them. I want fewer steps, not more. This is a much lower barrier to entry for me as a beginner in the health food market.

The 25% – 50% off also helps to close the gap between the sometimes inflated “organic” prices at the grocery store and removes that barrier as well, making Thrive Market an equally viable choice for the average person on a budget. Even if you’re not on a tight budget, who doesn’t love saving money?

Thrive Market also has recipes available if, like me, you’re still figuring out how to work new ingredients into your life. 

What you can buy:

Thrive Market carries 4,000+ healthy products, and you can shop hundreds of categories. Food; beauty, bath and body; health; babies and kids; home; pet supplies; and the all-inclusive “other”.

Find popular brands like Burt’s Bees, Acure, Annie’s, Seventh Generation, KIND, Bragg, Califa, Milkadamia, and Primal Kitchen.

While you can buy staples like meats and seafood (a new addition), the rest of Thrive Market’s selection is mostly shelf stable options, like a canned olive spread rather than a bushel of apples. For produce, you’ll probably still want to stop at your neighborhood store or Farmers Market. 

What other people are buying on Thrive Market:

You can shop best-sellers and the top customer-rated picks here, but some of the most popular items are Thrive Market Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil ($14.99, 170+ reviews), Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Mayo ($7.49, 1,070+ reviews), and Mushroom Coffee Mix ($11.99, 49 reviews).

Concerns:

Some people couldn’t conceive of buying groceries online — “but if I can’t hold the tomato in this hand, how do I know it will be the ripeness I like?”— and that’s obviously a legitimate concern. However, like most retailers, you will be protected by a return policy from Thrive Market (with traditional exceptions for things like intimates or perishables). If anything is wrong with your groceries or your order, though, let them know here within 7 days.

For me, the benefit of an all-organic shopping center and the convenience of savings and online shopping have meant that I’m willing to sacrifice the added insurance of picking everything out in person. But, like I said, I’m already an avid proponent of online grocery shopping to avoid lines, congested aisles, and the weighed-down 15 block walk back to my apartment.

Similarly, products are supposed to be markedly cheaper (25% – 50% off retail) but are they? We price-checked some of the most common purchases with Amazon, another cheap online grocery resource. 

Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Mayo, 12 oz (Thrive Market: $7.49, Amazon Groceries: $11.39).

Dr. Bronner’s Organic Virgin Coconut Oil, 30 Fl oz (Thrive Market: $15.99, Amazon Groceries: $24)

Napa Valley Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 25.4 Fl oz (Thrive Market: $10.99, Amazon Groceries: $13.82)

Simple Mills Almond Flour Pancake & Waffle Mix, 10.7 oz (Thrive Market: $5.99, Amazon Groceries: $7.99)

Thrive Market was not always cheaper, but when it was, it usually offered a large enough gap in savings to be substantial overall. 

Also, if you’re concerned about getting value out of your membership, Thrive Market guarantees their annual membership will pay for itself. If your membership fee was $60, but you only saved $40 in a year, they will automatically give you the difference ($20) in Thrive Market credit after you renew. 

If you need an added incentive, Thrive Market also has a program called ‘Thrive Gives’, which is their way of making healthy living affordable and accessible to anyone. Thrive Market understands that their yearly membership of $60 may not be in every single person’s budget, however, so, for every paid membership the site sells, they gift a free membership to someone in need. They also offer custom educational content to Thrive Gives members (shopping lists, recipes, a 22-part video course about how to eat healthy on a budget).

Thrive Market and Thrive Gives members enjoy the same access to “wholesome products at wholesale prices.” The Thrive Gives memberships are distributed through their nonprofit partners. The free membership also includes teachers, veterans, and first responders.

Start a free 30-day trial to Thrive Market >

Get 20% off your first three orders with the code “FIRST3” >

 

If you want to see more from Insider Picks, we’re collecting emails for an upcoming newsletter. You’ll be the first to hear about the stuff we cover. Click here to sign up .

Follow us on Pinterest.

Disclosure: This post is brought to you by Business Insider’s Insider Picks team. We aim to highlight products and services you might find interesting, and if you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback. Have something you think we should know about? Email us at insiderpicks@businessinsider.com.

Read the original article on Insider Picks. Copyright 2018. Follow Insider Picks on Twitter.

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Online grocery store Thrive Market sells affordable, organic food up to 50% off

The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you’ll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.

Thrive Market

Thrive Market curates the highest quality organic, non-GMO products (food, beauty, cleaning supplies) for you to shop from at 25% – 50% off retail prices.

The annual membership is $59.95. If you don’t save at least $60, they’ll give you the difference in credit at the end of the year after you renew.

85% of orders ship in two days or less. Orders over $49 always ship free.

Get 20% off your first 3 orders with the code “FIRST3” at checkout.

Here are Thrive Market’s must-haves.

I just recently came out of what was essentially a reverse-cleanse: a 12-pack of macaroni and cheese that I bought at a ‘great deal’ on Amazon groceries. A couple months of eating that semi-regularly and an unrelated but still unsettling health scare and I had reached the last impetus needed to commit to a complete pantry overhaul. 

I wanted and needed to expand my idea of value to include nutrition as well as quantity per dollar. It’s easy to default to your usual choices when the healthy substitute you’re considering trying for the first time is double the price of the product you habitually buy. The healthy option might actually taste good, and it may be better for your body, but it’s the classic case of the “better the devil you know.” On a budget, you go with a sure bet.

This concern of healthy foods being somewhat inaccessible through cost and education is something that the open-secret of a healthy grocery store, Thrive Market, is trying to address. And I can honestly say I wish that I had known about them sooner.

What Thrive Market is:

Thrive Market is an online marketplace that curates high-quality organic, non-GMO products at a discounted rate of 25% – 50% off retail prices to its members. Or, as they put it, “wholesome food at wholesale prices.”

An annual membership costs $59.95 (or, $5/month), and 85% of orders ship within two days or less. If you spend over $49, shipping is always free. 

Thrive Market currently ships to all contiguous US states and is looking to expand in the near future. 

How it works:

Register for free to browse the catalog and see member savings. You’ll receive 15% off your first purchase.

Start your 30-day trial: with your first purchase on Thrive Market, you’ll start a free 30-day membership trial. Cancel anytime.

If you love it, join Thrive Market for $59.95 for a year’s worth of savings on the site’s healthy product selection. When you join, you’re also sponsoring a free membership for a low-income family. 

You can shop by category, by values (ie. gluten-free, paleo, raw, vegan, for moms, etc.), or by current deals. You can also shop in the ‘My Aisle’ section that Thrive Market populates based on your interests noted in a shopping quiz you will take during the short registration. For me, that meant their “Top Organic Bundles”(for instance, this Healthy Snack Sampler they curated), best-sellers their shoppers love (like Avocado Oil Mayo),  and the “Organic Brand Spotlight” which was Annie’s Macaroni & Cheese. 

In addition to offering thousands of organic brands you could find at your local grocery store and online, they also have an in-house brand that packages organic products (the equivalent of your supermarket chain’s generic brand).

An example of potential savings when using Thrive Market or traditional grocery stores.Thrive Market

Who would get the most value out of Thrive Market:

If you spend a lot of time researching/want to eat healthy foods, have a dedicated diet or food restrictions, or consistently buy organic or non-GMO foods online, you’ll likely find at least a few compelling benefits to Thrive Market. 

I am considering a membership because I want to make healthier choices across the board in my life, and sometimes I can find the research and continuous trial-and-error testing too exhaustive and expensive. Quality is a concern with organic substitutes (great, but does it work?), and it’s helpful to have experts and customer ratings to simplify that judgment. The healthy eating community is an intense one, so it’s nice that Thrive Market makes use of all that helpful, accumulative passion.

When possible, I buy most of my groceries online to avoid the time commitment of in-person shopping, and I appreciate that Thrive Market makes healthy eating this simple. All the excess items in the local aisle have been removed, and I can scroll through and pick what I want and feel good buying it. Plus, while I’ve been reading a lot about healthy substitutes, it takes work to figure out which local grocery store will reliably carry them. I want fewer steps, not more. This is a much lower barrier to entry for me as a beginner in the health food market.

The 25% – 50% off also helps to close the gap between the sometimes inflated “organic” prices at the grocery store and removes that barrier as well, making Thrive Market an equally viable choice for the average person on a budget. Even if you’re not on a tight budget, who doesn’t love saving money?

Thrive Market also has recipes available if, like me, you’re still figuring out how to work new ingredients into your life. 

What you can buy:

Thrive Market carries 4,000+ healthy products, and you can shop hundreds of categories. Food; beauty, bath and body; health; babies and kids; home; pet supplies; and the all-inclusive “other”.

Find popular brands like Burt’s Bees, Acure, Annie’s, Seventh Generation, KIND, Bragg, Califa, Milkadamia, and Primal Kitchen.

While you can buy staples like meats and seafood (a new addition), the rest of Thrive Market’s selection is mostly shelf stable options, like a canned olive spread rather than a bushel of apples. For produce, you’ll probably still want to stop at your neighborhood store or Farmers Market. 

What other people are buying on Thrive Market:

You can shop best-sellers and the top customer-rated picks here, but some of the most popular items are Thrive Market Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil ($14.99, 170+ reviews), Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Mayo ($7.49, 1,070+ reviews), and Mushroom Coffee Mix ($11.99, 49 reviews).

Concerns:

Some people couldn’t conceive of buying groceries online — “but if I can’t hold the tomato in this hand, how do I know it will be the ripeness I like?”— and that’s obviously a legitimate concern. However, like most retailers, you will be protected by a return policy from Thrive Market (with traditional exceptions for things like intimates or perishables). If anything is wrong with your groceries or your order, though, let them know here within 7 days.

For me, the benefit of an all-organic shopping center and the convenience of savings and online shopping have meant that I’m willing to sacrifice the added insurance of picking everything out in person. But, like I said, I’m already an avid proponent of online grocery shopping to avoid lines, congested aisles, and the weighed-down 15 block walk back to my apartment.

Similarly, products are supposed to be markedly cheaper (25% – 50% off retail) but are they? We price-checked some of the most common purchases with Amazon, another cheap online grocery resource. 

Primal Kitchen Avocado Oil Mayo, 12 oz (Thrive Market: $7.49, Amazon Groceries: $11.39).

Dr. Bronner’s Organic Virgin Coconut Oil, 30 Fl oz (Thrive Market: $15.99, Amazon Groceries: $24)

Napa Valley Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 25.4 Fl oz (Thrive Market: $10.99, Amazon Groceries: $13.82)

Simple Mills Almond Flour Pancake & Waffle Mix, 10.7 oz (Thrive Market: $5.99, Amazon Groceries: $7.99)

Thrive Market was not always cheaper, but when it was, it usually offered a large enough gap in savings to be substantial overall. 

Also, if you’re concerned about getting value out of your membership, Thrive Market guarantees their annual membership will pay for itself. If your membership fee was $60, but you only saved $40 in a year, they will automatically give you the difference ($20) in Thrive Market credit after you renew. 

If you need an added incentive, Thrive Market also has a program called ‘Thrive Gives’, which is their way of making healthy living affordable and accessible to anyone. Thrive Market understands that their yearly membership of $60 may not be in every single person’s budget, however, so, for every paid membership the site sells, they gift a free membership to someone in need. They also offer custom educational content to Thrive Gives members (shopping lists, recipes, a 22-part video course about how to eat healthy on a budget).

Thrive Market and Thrive Gives members enjoy the same access to “wholesome products at wholesale prices.” The Thrive Gives memberships are distributed through their nonprofit partners. The free membership also includes teachers, veterans, and first responders.

Start a free 30-day trial to Thrive Market >

Get 20% off your first three orders with the code “FIRST3” >

 

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Coronavirus sparks a different kind of problem for social networks

id=”article-body” class=”row” section=”article-body”>

Racist tweets are spreading on Twitter after the coronavirus outbreak.

Getty Images

For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

Like many young people, Cheenee Osera enjoys posting videos to TikTok. The 23-year-old has racked up almost 45,000 followers with her upbeat dance moves and lip-syncing.

But lately, the joy of the social network has faded. The reason: Osera started receiving a flood of hurtful remarks on her live videos after the novel coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, China, in December.

TikTok users will spray questions, like “Do you have the coronavirus?” or “Have you been to China?,” at Osera, a Filipino-Chinese American student in Washington state. Some just write “coronavirus” alongside a green microbe emoji.

“It’s upsetting and disheartening that us Asians are dealing with this,” Osera said, adding that she blocked some users after filtering out comments with the words “corona” and “coronavirus” didn’t stop the ignorant remarks. “People need to understand that just because you see an Asian, that doesn’t necessarily mean we have the coronavirus.”

Osera isn’t the only person grappling with this social media woe. As COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the coronavirus, spreads, Asians have become the target of hateful, racist and xenophobic remarks on social media platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and TikTok. None of these companies seems fully prepared to handle the burst in bigotry, and all are struggling to balance their rules against hate speech with their support of free expression.

CNET Coronavirus Update

Keep track of the coronavirus pandemic.

It’s hard to quantify the spike in racist posts targeting Asians on social media. Facebook, Twitter and TikTok didn’t respond to questions about whether they’ve seen an increase in hate speech reports since the start of the coronavirus outbreak. Advocacy groups, however, say there’s been a rise in discrimination, violence and harmful rhetoric directed toward Asians in recent months. CNET found dozens of hateful comments and posts about Asians across social media, including those that used ethnic slurs and perpetuated stereotypes.

“Language that fans flames of xenophobia endangers our communities who are experiencing heightened discrimination,” Asian Americans Advancing Justice, a civil rights coalition, said in a tweet.

Politicians have also been accused of making xenophobic and racist remarks. President Donald Trump has referred to the contagion as the “Chinese virus,” a term that critics say deflects from the global nature of the pandemic and stokes discrimination against Asian Americans and immigrants. Trump has said the term isn’t racist because the illness was first detected in China. (On Monday, the president appeared to change tack, referring to the contagion simply as “the virus” during a press conference. He also said: “It’s very important that we totally protect our Asian American community in the United States and all around the world. They’re amazing people, and the spreading of the virus is not their fault in any way shape or form.”)

Now playing: Watch this: Let’s talk about why ‘Chinese virus’ is such a harmful…

7:37

People of Asian descent aren’t at greater risk of spreading COVID-19 than other Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The World Health Organization has said that people should avoid referring to any disease using the name of a location. 

Still, racist remarks are spilling outside of social media and into the real world. In some cases, Asian people have been taunted or assaulted by people using coronavirus as an excuse. A man attacked an Asian woman wearing a mask in a New York subway station in a video tweeted by the New York Police Department Hate Crimes Task Force in February. A person who witnessed the incident said the attacker called the Asian woman a “diseased bitch.” Two teens were arrested after allegedly beating up a 23-year-old Singaporean man in London earlier this month. The man, Jonathan Mok, told BBC News that one attacker who kicked him said, “I don’t want your coronavirus in my country.” Nearly two dozen Asian-Americans told The New York Times they were afraid to do activities such as grocery shopping and have been yelled at in public.

Now playing: Watch this: Coronavirus lockdown: Why social distancing saves lives

5:41

Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, says the flood of bigoted comments will prove trying for the platforms.

“This is a test right now,” Levin said. “The coronavirus, on a variety of levels, including misinformation and bigotry, are going to be part of the lesson plan as to what social media companies did right and wrong when the corporate history books are written.”

Policing online hate speech

Facebook, Twitter and TikTok have similar rules against posting hate speech, but they appear to be enforcing the policies differently. CNET showed Facebook, Twitter and TikTok several hateful coronavirus-related comments and posts directed at Asians. Twitter left most of the posts up, while Facebook-owned Instagram and TikTok pulled them down. The rules are especially confusing for users who flag posts for hate speech but don’t receive a clear explanation when they aren’t removed. Some never hear back.

Twitter, which once earned the reputation as “the free speech wing of the free speech party,” appears to allow more leeway than other platforms.

Twitter said this tweet and others that users have called racist doesn’t violate its rules.

Screenshot by Queenie Wong/CNET

In March, Chicago rapper Lil Reese, who uses the handle @LilReese300, tweeted that Chinese people are “nasty.” He blamed them for screwing up the world, using an emoji to represent the planet. The tweet has more than 59,000 likes and was shared more than 15,000 times.

Not everyone approved of Lil Reese’s sentiment, including skier Gus Kenworthy, who tweeted the rapper should consider a new handle — @LilRacist300 — on the platform.

Lil Reese didn’t respond to an email from CNET asking for comment. However, the rapper posted a copy of the email to an Instagram story, adding “suck my wang a thang.” Images shared on Instagram Stories disappear after 24 hours, but a company spokeswoman said it was removed early for violating the platform’s rules against posting personally identifiable information and attacking someone based on ethnicity.

After the NBA abruptly suspended its season, Twitter users expressed outrage about the end of games, tweeting ethnic slurs at Asians and calling for a boycott of China. In one case, a user tweeted that Chinese people should enjoy their “Bat and Chimpanzee soup.” Another user tweeted that he told a “Chinese bitch” who was offering a free food sample “NO CORONAVIRUS!!”

Twitter said those tweets didn’t violate its rules, which prohibit users from repeatedly using slurs, tropes or other content that degrades someone. As of Monday evening, the tweets are still publicly visible.

Still, Twitter has asked some users to remove certain hateful tweets.

Coronavirus updates

Gig workers say sick pay for coronavirus is hard to come by

What coronavirus means for our sex lives

Homemade face masks: 7 critical truths you need to know now

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One user said on March 11 that Chinese people are “very dirty people” who started the “epidemic” and that “karma should be on them” and not the rest of the world. Twitter initially said that tweet didn’t violate its rules, but after CNET asked the company for an explanation it was removed on Sunday. The company, which said Monday it won’t be able to take action against every misleading COVID-19 tweet, appears to draw the line when the content clearly incites physical harm.

A tweet by John McAfee, the founder of the security company that bears his name, falsely stated the “Coronavirus cannot attack black people because it is a Chinese virus.” The tweet was pulled down after a complaint by US Rep. Bobby Lee Rush, an Illinois Democrat.

Twitter said the tweet violated its rules and McAfee was locked out of his account until he removed it. The company recently broadened its definition of harm to include “claims that specific groups, nationalities are more susceptible to COVID-19.” McAfee said on Facebook the tweet was a “joke making fun of the anti-Chinese racial conflicts sweeping the world.” 

Rush, however, didn’t find McAfee’s humor amusing. “Companies like Facebook & Twitter need to step their game up when it comes to false and misleading information, especially when that information is downright racist,” he said in a tweet.

Fueling Asian stereotypes

On TikTok, one video zoomed in on several Asian students wearing masks as music that included the phrase “coronavirus check” played in the background. The video attracted more than 90,000 likes before it was removed after CNET showed it to the service.

TikTok users accused a Korean-American creator of eating bats and spreading the virus. TikTok said the comments violate its rules and have been removed.

Screenshot by Queenie Wong/CNET

In a popular video about what to bring while traveling during the coronavirus outbreak, a user commented that one Korean-American creator was “patient zero” and ate bats.

Asian TikTok creators have received comments on their videos asking if they have the virus. Some users have accused Asians of eating dogs, bats and snakes.

A TikTok spokeswoman said those comments violate the company’s rules against content that “attacks or incites violence against an individual or a group of individuals on the basis of protected attributes,” including ethnicity. “Broadly speaking, hate speech has no place on TikTok,” she said. The comments have been removed. Chinese tech company ByteDance owns TikTok, an app known for its quirky short-form videos.

Some troubling posts are subtly racist. On Facebook-owned Instagram, a user wrote “Coronavirus for all” under a post about an annual dragon parade by the Mills 50 District in Orlando, Florida.

Grayson Gibson, a Florida photographer, reported the comment to Instagram for hate speech, but the company initially said the comment didn’t violate its rules.

“Even if it’s something as small as that, it’s important to draw attention to it and get it taken down because I feel like a lot of racism towards Asians is kind of swept under the rug,” said Gibson, who is half white and half Filipino.

A Belgian school posted this image on its Facebook page and Instagram account but removed it after facing backlash. Instagram said this image would violate its rules.

Screenshot by Queenie Wong/CNET

After CNET reached out to Instagram, a company spokeswoman said Instagram doesn’t allow content “designed to incite hatred towards others” and removed the comment for violating its rules.

In March, the Sint Paulusschool campus College Waregem in Belgium faced criticism after posting a photo on its Facebook and Instagram pages that showed students wearing Chinese traditional costumes, panda outfits and conical hats as they held up a sign that read “Corona Time.” The school apologized in a statement, stating that the outfits had been chosen for an event long before the coronavirus outbreak, the Independent reported. 

“The students alluded to the recent events in a playful way by adding a sign. Neither the school team, nor the students involved, have ever had the intention of adopting a condescending or offensive attitude,” the school said in the statement.

An Instagram spokeswoman said the photo violates its rules. The school removed the photo after the backlash.

Some users have seen racist comments pop up in private Facebook groups. Katherine Sliter, a psychometrician and consultant in Ohio, said a woman posted that “Chinese people eat weird things and are dirty, so their bodies can’t fight germs and it spreads” in a private Facebook group for moms that had more than 10,000 members. Sliter, who declined to name the group, said she and others reported the post to the group’s administrators and it’s since been taken down.

Reporting hate

Meanwhile, advocacy groups are still trying to track hate incidents.

Marita Etcubañez, director of strategic initiatives at Asian Americans Advancing Justice, encourages users to report racist posts to both the companies and groups like AAAJ so the incidents are documented. The group runs a website that allows people to report hateful conduct, information that could help advocates figure out the scope of the problem and craft potential solutions.

“There’s also power in sharing your story and feeling heard and for other folks to understand that if this happens to them, they’re not alone,” she said.

The Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council and Chinese for Affirmative Action also launched a website so users could report incidents of hate. Asians have been using #WashTheHate and #IAmNotAVirus to share their stories on social media. Asian-American celebrities including Lost actor Daniel Dae Kim, Mulan star Tzi Ma and Crazy Rich Asians actress Awkwafina have spoken out about racist language used during the pandemic.

“I am saddened by the rhetoric that has come out of this, and the cruelty that came as a result,” Awkwafina said in an Instagram post on Tuesday. 

Osera, the TikTok user in Washington, took to Twitter to speak out against a user who wrote and misspelled coronavirus as a response to a comment she had made on another user’s video.

“It’s not that hard to be nice, you guys,” she tweeted. “I don’t understand why people find the need to hate.”

Coronavirus in pictures: Scenes from around the world

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Coronavirus sparks a different kind of problem for social networks

id=”article-body” class=”row” section=”article-body”>

Racist tweets are spreading on Twitter after the coronavirus outbreak.

Getty Images

For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

Like many young people, Cheenee Osera enjoys posting videos to TikTok. The 23-year-old has racked up almost 45,000 followers with her upbeat dance moves and lip-syncing.

But lately, the joy of the social network has faded. The reason: Osera started receiving a flood of hurtful remarks on her live videos after the novel coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, China, in December.

TikTok users will spray questions, like “Do you have the coronavirus?” or “Have you been to China?,” at Osera, a Filipino-Chinese American student in Washington state. Some just write “coronavirus” alongside a green microbe emoji.

“It’s upsetting and disheartening that us Asians are dealing with this,” Osera said, adding that she blocked some users after filtering out comments with the words “corona” and “coronavirus” didn’t stop the ignorant remarks. “People need to understand that just because you see an Asian, that doesn’t necessarily mean we have the coronavirus.”

Osera isn’t the only person grappling with this social media woe. As COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the coronavirus, spreads, Asians have become the target of hateful, racist and xenophobic remarks on social media platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and TikTok. None of these companies seems fully prepared to handle the burst in bigotry, and all are struggling to balance their rules against hate speech with their support of free expression.

CNET Coronavirus Update

Keep track of the coronavirus pandemic.

It’s hard to quantify the spike in racist posts targeting Asians on social media. Facebook, Twitter and TikTok didn’t respond to questions about whether they’ve seen an increase in hate speech reports since the start of the coronavirus outbreak. Advocacy groups, however, say there’s been a rise in discrimination, violence and harmful rhetoric directed toward Asians in recent months. CNET found dozens of hateful comments and posts about Asians across social media, including those that used ethnic slurs and perpetuated stereotypes.

“Language that fans flames of xenophobia endangers our communities who are experiencing heightened discrimination,” Asian Americans Advancing Justice, a civil rights coalition, said in a tweet.

Politicians have also been accused of making xenophobic and racist remarks. President Donald Trump has referred to the contagion as the “Chinese virus,” a term that critics say deflects from the global nature of the pandemic and stokes discrimination against Asian Americans and immigrants. Trump has said the term isn’t racist because the illness was first detected in China. (On Monday, the president appeared to change tack, referring to the contagion simply as “the virus” during a press conference. He also said: “It’s very important that we totally protect our Asian American community in the United States and all around the world. They’re amazing people, and the spreading of the virus is not their fault in any way shape or form.”)

Now playing: Watch this: Let’s talk about why ‘Chinese virus’ is such a harmful…

7:37

People of Asian descent aren’t at greater risk of spreading COVID-19 than other Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The World Health Organization has said that people should avoid referring to any disease using the name of a location. 

Still, racist remarks are spilling outside of social media and into the real world. In some cases, Asian people have been taunted or assaulted by people using coronavirus as an excuse. A man attacked an Asian woman wearing a mask in a New York subway station in a video tweeted by the New York Police Department Hate Crimes Task Force in February. A person who witnessed the incident said the attacker called the Asian woman a “diseased bitch.” Two teens were arrested after allegedly beating up a 23-year-old Singaporean man in London earlier this month. The man, Jonathan Mok, told BBC News that one attacker who kicked him said, “I don’t want your coronavirus in my country.” Nearly two dozen Asian-Americans told The New York Times they were afraid to do activities such as grocery shopping and have been yelled at in public.

Now playing: Watch this: Coronavirus lockdown: Why social distancing saves lives

5:41

Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, says the flood of bigoted comments will prove trying for the platforms.

“This is a test right now,” Levin said. “The coronavirus, on a variety of levels, including misinformation and bigotry, are going to be part of the lesson plan as to what social media companies did right and wrong when the corporate history books are written.”

Policing online hate speech

Facebook, Twitter and TikTok have similar rules against posting hate speech, but they appear to be enforcing the policies differently. CNET showed Facebook, Twitter and TikTok several hateful coronavirus-related comments and posts directed at Asians. Twitter left most of the posts up, while Facebook-owned Instagram and TikTok pulled them down. The rules are especially confusing for users who flag posts for hate speech but don’t receive a clear explanation when they aren’t removed. Some never hear back.

Twitter, which once earned the reputation as “the free speech wing of the free speech party,” appears to allow more leeway than other platforms.

Twitter said this tweet and others that users have called racist doesn’t violate its rules.

Screenshot by Queenie Wong/CNET

In March, Chicago rapper Lil Reese, who uses the handle @LilReese300, tweeted that Chinese people are “nasty.” He blamed them for screwing up the world, using an emoji to represent the planet. The tweet has more than 59,000 likes and was shared more than 15,000 times.

Not everyone approved of Lil Reese’s sentiment, including skier Gus Kenworthy, who tweeted the rapper should consider a new handle — @LilRacist300 — on the platform.

Lil Reese didn’t respond to an email from CNET asking for comment. However, the rapper posted a copy of the email to an Instagram story, adding “suck my wang a thang.” Images shared on Instagram Stories disappear after 24 hours, but a company spokeswoman said it was removed early for violating the platform’s rules against posting personally identifiable information and attacking someone based on ethnicity.

After the NBA abruptly suspended its season, Twitter users expressed outrage about the end of games, tweeting ethnic slurs at Asians and calling for a boycott of China. In one case, a user tweeted that Chinese people should enjoy their “Bat and Chimpanzee soup.” Another user tweeted that he told a “Chinese bitch” who was offering a free food sample “NO CORONAVIRUS!!”

Twitter said those tweets didn’t violate its rules, which prohibit users from repeatedly using slurs, tropes or other content that degrades someone. As of Monday evening, the tweets are still publicly visible.

Still, Twitter has asked some users to remove certain hateful tweets.

Coronavirus updates

Gig workers say sick pay for coronavirus is hard to come by

What coronavirus means for our sex lives

Homemade face masks: 7 critical truths you need to know now

China will rerelease Avengers and Avatar to revive cinemas

One user said on March 11 that Chinese people are “very dirty people” who started the “epidemic” and that “karma should be on them” and not the rest of the world. Twitter initially said that tweet didn’t violate its rules, but after CNET asked the company for an explanation it was removed on Sunday. The company, which said Monday it won’t be able to take action against every misleading COVID-19 tweet, appears to draw the line when the content clearly incites physical harm.

A tweet by John McAfee, the founder of the security company that bears his name, falsely stated the “Coronavirus cannot attack black people because it is a Chinese virus.” The tweet was pulled down after a complaint by US Rep. Bobby Lee Rush, an Illinois Democrat.

Twitter said the tweet violated its rules and McAfee was locked out of his account until he removed it. The company recently broadened its definition of harm to include “claims that specific groups, nationalities are more susceptible to COVID-19.” McAfee said on Facebook the tweet was a “joke making fun of the anti-Chinese racial conflicts sweeping the world.” 

Rush, however, didn’t find McAfee’s humor amusing. “Companies like Facebook & Twitter need to step their game up when it comes to false and misleading information, especially when that information is downright racist,” he said in a tweet.

Fueling Asian stereotypes

On TikTok, one video zoomed in on several Asian students wearing masks as music that included the phrase “coronavirus check” played in the background. The video attracted more than 90,000 likes before it was removed after CNET showed it to the service.

TikTok users accused a Korean-American creator of eating bats and spreading the virus. TikTok said the comments violate its rules and have been removed.

Screenshot by Queenie Wong/CNET

In a popular video about what to bring while traveling during the coronavirus outbreak, a user commented that one Korean-American creator was “patient zero” and ate bats.

Asian TikTok creators have received comments on their videos asking if they have the virus. Some users have accused Asians of eating dogs, bats and snakes.

A TikTok spokeswoman said those comments violate the company’s rules against content that “attacks or incites violence against an individual or a group of individuals on the basis of protected attributes,” including ethnicity. “Broadly speaking, hate speech has no place on TikTok,” she said. The comments have been removed. Chinese tech company ByteDance owns TikTok, an app known for its quirky short-form videos.

Some troubling posts are subtly racist. On Facebook-owned Instagram, a user wrote “Coronavirus for all” under a post about an annual dragon parade by the Mills 50 District in Orlando, Florida.

Grayson Gibson, a Florida photographer, reported the comment to Instagram for hate speech, but the company initially said the comment didn’t violate its rules.

“Even if it’s something as small as that, it’s important to draw attention to it and get it taken down because I feel like a lot of racism towards Asians is kind of swept under the rug,” said Gibson, who is half white and half Filipino.

A Belgian school posted this image on its Facebook page and Instagram account but removed it after facing backlash. Instagram said this image would violate its rules.

Screenshot by Queenie Wong/CNET

After CNET reached out to Instagram, a company spokeswoman said Instagram doesn’t allow content “designed to incite hatred towards others” and removed the comment for violating its rules.

In March, the Sint Paulusschool campus College Waregem in Belgium faced criticism after posting a photo on its Facebook and Instagram pages that showed students wearing Chinese traditional costumes, panda outfits and conical hats as they held up a sign that read “Corona Time.” The school apologized in a statement, stating that the outfits had been chosen for an event long before the coronavirus outbreak, the Independent reported. 

“The students alluded to the recent events in a playful way by adding a sign. Neither the school team, nor the students involved, have ever had the intention of adopting a condescending or offensive attitude,” the school said in the statement.

An Instagram spokeswoman said the photo violates its rules. The school removed the photo after the backlash.

Some users have seen racist comments pop up in private Facebook groups. Katherine Sliter, a psychometrician and consultant in Ohio, said a woman posted that “Chinese people eat weird things and are dirty, so their bodies can’t fight germs and it spreads” in a private Facebook group for moms that had more than 10,000 members. Sliter, who declined to name the group, said she and others reported the post to the group’s administrators and it’s since been taken down.

Reporting hate

Meanwhile, advocacy groups are still trying to track hate incidents.

Marita Etcubañez, director of strategic initiatives at Asian Americans Advancing Justice, encourages users to report racist posts to both the companies and groups like AAAJ so the incidents are documented. The group runs a website that allows people to report hateful conduct, information that could help advocates figure out the scope of the problem and craft potential solutions.

“There’s also power in sharing your story and feeling heard and for other folks to understand that if this happens to them, they’re not alone,” she said.

The Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council and Chinese for Affirmative Action also launched a website so users could report incidents of hate. Asians have been using #WashTheHate and #IAmNotAVirus to share their stories on social media. Asian-American celebrities including Lost actor Daniel Dae Kim, Mulan star Tzi Ma and Crazy Rich Asians actress Awkwafina have spoken out about racist language used during the pandemic.

“I am saddened by the rhetoric that has come out of this, and the cruelty that came as a result,” Awkwafina said in an Instagram post on Tuesday. 

Osera, the TikTok user in Washington, took to Twitter to speak out against a user who wrote and misspelled coronavirus as a response to a comment she had made on another user’s video.

“It’s not that hard to be nice, you guys,” she tweeted. “I don’t understand why people find the need to hate.”

Coronavirus in pictures: Scenes from around the world

See all photos

+54 More

Internet Services TikTok Coronavirus Facebook Instagram Twitter

Notification on

Notification off

Tech Industry